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  • David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

    Has anyone seen them? They are getting fantastic reviews. I will have to plant the seed in my wife's ear for Christmas.

  • #2
    Re: David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

    I have. They are good, though, as I noted in another thread, he shows some basic things (like the fighting stance) much differently than they are taught in KMWW. The principles seem consistent with what I've been taught so far, but some specifics in technique differ.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

      Originally posted by tzrider View Post
      I have. They are good, though, as I noted in another thread, he shows some basic things (like the fighting stance) much differently than they are taught in KMWW. The principles seem consistent with what I've been taught so far, but some specifics in technique differ.

      Is the "Gidon System" the least evolved? Not saying not good, mind you, just least changed from Imi's original teachings?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

        Originally posted by bear34 View Post
        Is the "Gidon System" the least evolved? Not saying not good, mind you, just least changed from Imi's original teachings?
        I have no idea. Hopefully someone who does know will chime in.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

          Originally posted by tzrider View Post
          I have. They are good, though, as I noted in another thread, he shows some basic things (like the fighting stance) much differently than they are taught in KMWW. The principles seem consistent with what I've been taught so far, but some specifics in technique differ.
          David does teach the stance a little different, but he also add that it is HIS preference and that it is optional.

          His original instructor(and mine) Rick Blitstein doesn't teach it that way, nor do I.

          As far as being the least evolved system, there are some people that have said that Haim's system has added too much ground fighting to it, which is very different from the original system. He also is constantly refining it based on current threats faced in Israel. People who would do us harm are always evolving, so we have to as well.

          I rather focus on not going to the ground, and if I do, get up as quick as possible before others arrive. Dirty fighting does, that, not fancy locks.

          .03

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

            Originally posted by Plantman View Post
            David does teach the stance a little different, but he also add that it is HIS preference and that it is optional.

            His original instructor(and mine) Rick Blitstein doesn't teach it that way, nor do I.

            As far as being the least evolved system, there are some people that have said that Haim's system has added too much ground fighting to it, which is very different from the original system. He also is constantly refining it based on current threats faced in Israel. People who would do us harm are always evolving, so we have to as well.

            I rather focus on not going to the ground, and if I do, get up as quick as possible before others arrive. Dirty fighting does, that, not fancy locks.

            .03
            No disrespect intended. My phrasing was unfortunate.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

              I think it's important to note that when one is at this level of skill, there is not a set dogma for stance, movement etc. Khan is a very dynamic practitioner, as well as most of the top level dudes from all associations.

              Krav Maga, while having certain tenets and core concepts is, at heart much about conservation of movement and simplicity. To see a top level practitioner regardless of affiliation, deviate from some minor form in syllabus, is expected and should be expoounded and encouraged after the core movements are worked to death and beyond. I'm pretty sure Darren, John, Eyal, David, Itay et al. Have earned the the right to improvise for fluidity of motion.

              I also agree with Plantman that going to the ground, in Krav Maga presences, is a secondary option. I too have seen Khan shift some emphasis to takedowns to the ground and Wonder if it's just not a sign of the times. Why take yourself (with your opponent) to the ground if you don't have to?
              Last edited by Coda Vex; 09-18-2011, 08:13 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

                Guys,

                Thank you for your interest in my DVDs. The fighting stance we use in Israel is bladed rather than square. Principally, this configuration is to protect the groin but it also allows for quicker defensive movement because of the body's weight distribution slightly over the front leg while resting on both balls of the feet. Also, the stance allows for quicker foreleg defensive and offensive movements along with the straight lead punch/kick because the feet are not pointed directly forward but, rather, are pre-positioned. The fingers are not splayed to prevent their being attacked. Essentially, you are not leaving your center-line open.

                Regarding groundwork, as those who have seen the DVDs will concur, I specifically emphasize not going to ground. However, given the skill of today's amateur and professional fighters alike, we need to be competent on the ground, hence, our learning certain takedowns to understand the takedown dynamic to better counter it. If you are taken down, you must understand how to counter any of the myriad bars, chokes, and locks which are becoming increasingly prevalent not to mention weapon assaults. As you guys know, generally, if you can fight against a trained fighter, you can fight against an untrained fighter, but not necessarily the other way around. To be sure, untrained fighters also pose their own specific risks.

                Lastly, most people outside of a small circle of original practitioners in Israel do not know that Imi formally approved many of these modifications and additions made by Haim Gidon in the early 1990's while sitting in the IKMA's main training center observing the evolution of krav maga. From the IKMA's standpoint, the system has not changed to put a personal imprint on it, but, rather to make it, what I consider to be the most effective fighting system in the world. Please feel free to respond to this or any pose any additional questions you might like.

                Best,

                David Kahn
                Last edited by davidkahn; 11-14-2011, 07:29 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

                  Originally posted by davidkahn View Post
                  Guys,

                  Thank you for your interest in my DVDs. The fighting stance we use in Israel is bladed rather than square. Principally, this configuration is to protect the groin but it also allows for quicker defensive movement because of the body's weight distribution slightly over the front leg while resting on both balls of the feet. Also, the stance allows for quicker foreleg defensive and offensive movements along with the straight lead punch/kick because the feet are not pointed directly forward but, rather, are pre-positioned. The fingers are not splayed to prevent their being attacked. Essentially, you are not leaving your center-line open.

                  Regarding groundwork, as those who have seen the DVDs will concur, I specifically emphasize not going to ground. However, given the skill of today's amateur and professional fighters alike, we need to be competent on the ground, hence, our learning certain takedowns to understand the takedown dynamic to better counter it. If you are taken down, you must understand how to counter any of the myriad bars, chokes, and locks which are becoming increasingly prevalent not to mention weapon assaults. As you guys know, generally, if you can fight against a trained fighter, you can fight against an untrained fighter, but not necessarily the other way around. To be sure, untrained fighters also pose their own specific risks.

                  Lastly, most people outside of a small circle of original practitioners in Israel do not know that Imi formally approved many of these modifications and additions made by Haim Gidon in the early 1990's while sitting in the IKMA's main training center observing the evolution of krav maga. From the IKMA's standpoint, the system has not changed to put a personal imprint on it, but, rather to make it, what I consider to be the most effective fighting system in the world. Please feel free to respond to this or any pose any additional questions you might like.

                  Best,

                  David Kahn
                  Thanks for responding. I recently saw a credit card charge for the DVD set on our statement. I'm very excited. Merry Christmas to me!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

                    The books are Simply amazing. I had purchased them before I started with KMWW and have found them still useful three years later. I just ordered the DVD's they will be here in a week so happy early X-mas/B-day to me, yeyeah!.
                    Mr. Kahn you sir are a Krav'ma'god! Cheers! I will comment again after I review the courses.
                    I'm a chicken nugget... BBQ sauce me!!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

                      Hi all

                      Let me firstly state that I am an IKMF practitioner (so I have no bias for or against the IKMA/Gidon System).

                      These DVDs are truly fantastic tools to assist your current training. In fact, I have yet to see better content driven material on Krav Maga in any format. The instruction is A-1, communicated eloquently and clearly (David states that it is preferred to not go to ground, but the current reality is that it may end up there and with a trained grappler). It is better to know than not to know.

                      It's also great to see some options that adhere to strict use of force laws — some of these 'fancy locks' may save you as well as the attacker (depending on case by case scenarios).

                      I couldn't wait for Christmas so I got mine early!! You won't be disappointed in the least!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

                        Originally posted by davidkahn View Post
                        Guys,

                        Thank you for your interest in my DVDs. The fighting stance we use in Israel is bladed rather than square. Principally, this configuration is to protect the groin but it also allows for quicker defensive movement because of the body's weight distribution slightly over the front leg while resting on both balls of the feet. Also, the stance allows for quicker foreleg defensive and offensive movements along with the straight lead punch/kick because the feet are not pointed directly forward but, rather, are pre-positioned. The fingers are not splayed to prevent their being attacked. Essentially, you are not leaving your center-line open.

                        Regarding groundwork, as those who have seen the DVDs will concur, I specifically emphasize not going to ground. However, given the skill of today's amateur and professional fighters alike, we need to be competent on the ground, hence, our learning certain takedowns to understand the takedown dynamic to better counter it. If you are taken down, you must understand how to counter any of the myriad bars, chokes, and locks which are becoming increasingly prevalent not to mention weapon assaults. As you guys know, generally, if you can fight against a trained fighter, you can fight against an untrained fighter, but not necessarily the other way around. To be sure, untrained fighters also pose their own specific risks.

                        Lastly, most people outside of a small circle of original practitioners in Israel do not know that Imi formally approved many of these modifications and additions made by Haim Gidon in the early 1990's while sitting in the IKMA's main training center observing the evolution of krav maga. From the IKMA's standpoint, the system has not changed to put a personal imprint on it, but, rather to make it, what I consider to be the most effective fighting system in the world. Please feel free to respond to this or any pose any additional questions you might like.

                        Best,

                        David Kahn
                        Welcome to the forum David!

                        I haven't had the opportunity to view your DVDs or books, but from what I'm reading here, sounds like I need to start

                        Please don't be a stranger
                        Do, or do not. There is no try - Jedi Master Yoda
                        This is Krav, not scrapbooking- Instructor Jeremy Stafford
                        Krav Air - We serve up NUTS
                        - San Antonio Center's Mock Airplane Motto
                        Disneyland, but more violent - SashaTheStrange explaining KM to a friend
                        Know who you are and what you're capable of. Walk away if you can. Run away if you must. Defend yourself if you have no other choice.- Instructor Steve Tornovish

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

                          Hi Everyone,

                          Thank you again for your warm welcome. Another point following up on Plantman's insights might be of interest. Obviously, the krav maga taught within the IDF and Israeli security establishment has evolved to better meet modern threats and professional needs. For example, with the IDF's eventual adoption of the Tavor (a bull-up assault rifle the length of which is considerably shorter than the M-4's and M-16's now in use, not to mention the IDF's historical rifles such as the FN FAL, Mauser's, Lee-Enfields) because of its design, modifies its use as a cold-weapon. But tactics in some sense also come full circle because of the IDF's use of the Uzi sub-machinegun. In addition, specific edged weapons and their use also require Israeli krav maga's evolution and modification to counter these threats. Grandmaster Haim Gidon and Sgt. Major (res.) Nir Maman are very much involved in this process.

                          On the civilian side as well, as I noted in my first post, modifications to the traditional curriculum of the 1980's are also required because of the increasingly widespread popularity of MMA. People have much easier access to learning professional chokes, throws, takedowns and fighting skills. I show these and some of the corresponding core defensive tactics in the DVDs.

                          As one example of Israeli krav maga's evolution to counter some of these tactics, our particular bear-hug defense from the rear (hands free) recognizes that many people will no longer grab you from behind without burying their heads. Of course, by burying their heads, they can negate krav maga's successive counter-elbow strikes. Also, in leaning heavily forward, the defender can set himself up for a trip that will drive him hard face first into the ground with the attacker's choice of whether to go to ground with him (having taken his back) or simply let go and kick the defender in the back of his head.

                          Best,

                          David Kahn

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

                            @David Kahn: Hi there! Got a few questions I hope you might have time to answer:
                            1. I train in krav maga global system, what would you say differs IKMA from that? If I understand correct, the techniques are quite the same in most KM systems, but the syllabus/curriculums are built different. Am I right or way off?
                            2. The ground- and takedown-techniques you use - would you care to present them short here? Just curious to see what you put into it. I respect if you wanna keep them to those that actually train your stuff, but as most systems are transparent anyhow these days - you might wanna share here?
                            Thanks!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: David Kahn "Mastering Krav Maga" series

                              Hi,

                              The IKMA under Grandmaster Gidon does have some significant differences both in both training and approach compared to the other organizations. The IKMA (Gidon System) focuses on both self-defense and hand-to-hand combat. At the higher training levels, one must be able to successfully defend against a professionally trained attacker -- hand-to-hand combat.

                              I can tell you first hand that until I trained in Israel, I really did not understand that there was any siginfiicant difference between organizations and the top instructors. But my first instructor Rick Blitstein understood this well when he sent me to the IKMA for my instructor training. In short, seeing is believing. Obviously, with the breadth of video now available, comparisons are somewhat more accessible.

                              Grandmaster Gidon also tests the IKMA's techniques against resistance and a non-compliant opponent. To this day, Haim actively trains/fights with us on the mat. He does not simply teach or theorize.

                              Haim visited us this past October for our annual U.S. course and we had opportunity to discuss yet again the ongoing evolution of the system. Haim noted that all of the other krav maga organizations are now trying to adopt groundwork. Many of these organizations' top instructors are personally training with groundwork specialists.

                              It should be noted again, that Haim began developing the IKMA's groundwork approach under Imi's watchful eye in the early 1990's before most others realized the necessity of street oriented groundwork. Most importantly, Haim adopted a krav maga approach rather than a sport-oriented approach.

                              There are also significant differences in our weapon defenses, again, approved by Imi.

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